TECAID Outcomes

Outcomes: TECAID Participants

Over time, significant beneficial changes in TECAID participants’ outcomes emerged in three critical areas:

The specific outcomes shown below correspond to survey results detailing ways in which TECAID participants experienced significant growth or gains (statistically significant findings via the TECAID evaluator). The first survey was conducted in March 2015 after the department teams were selected and before TECAID activities began. The last (third) survey was conducted in August and September 2016, following 18 months of intensive TECAID professional development activities.

Knowledge and Use of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Concepts

Participant knowledge and interactions related to the concepts of inclusive culture, micro-inequities, value of diversity, and stereotype threat all showed statistically significant changes over the course of the TECAID professional development activities. Increases in knowledge and comfort with DEI concepts are necessary because they enable change leaders to have knowledgeable discussions about DEI with colleagues. In addition, TECAID participants indicated significant positive changes in how these DEI concepts informed their ongoing interactions with department colleagues.

By the end of the professional development program, 100% of TECAID participants reported they felt somewhat or very comfortable describing inclusive culture to a colleague.

By the end of the professional development program, 68% of participants reported feeling either very comfortable or somewhat comfortable discussing the concept of micro-inequities with a colleague.

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By the end of the professional development program, 96% of the participants reported knowing the concept of micro-inequities, an increase of 37%. In addition, 69% of participants said their knowledge of micro-inequities informs their interactions with others in their department, an increase from 33%.

By the end of the professional development program, 100% of participants reported knowing the concept of stereotype threat. In addition, 61% of participants reported that stereotype threat informed their interactions with department colleagues either occasionally, weekly, or daily-- an increase from 37%.

By the end of the professional development program, there was also a sharp decrease (26% to 9%) in participants who said this concept doesn't really affect their interactions.

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Knowledge and Confidence in Leading Change to Advance Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

Engineering faculty are not typically trained in leading academic culture change. As a result of TECAID participation, participants reported statistically significant increases in a) the importance of leaders for shaping departmental climate, b) understanding how to engage productively in change processes, c) confidence in their leadership skills, d) confidence to engage colleagues in departmental change, e) confidence in marshaling the resources necessary for change, and f) confidence in how to create organizational change. As a result, even TECAID participants who were not in formal leadership roles were able to begin leading their colleagues toward more inclusive cultures. This knowledge and confidence in leadership skills and roles builds strong individuals who can lead change. Developing an understanding of how to create academic change and confidence in doing so are important steps toward making substantive and sustainable culture shifts.   

By the end of the professional development program, 87% of participants agreed that departmental leaders are important in shaping the culture.

By the end of the professional development program, 91% of participants reported that they somewhat or strongly agreed that they understand how to engage productively in change processes.

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By the end of the professional development program, 92% of participants reported feeling somewhat or very confident in their leadership skills. Those who felt unconfident dropped by half, with only 9% expressing a lack of confidence.

Engaging colleagues and getting buy-in for departmental change is a critical competency. By the end of the professional development program, 86% of the participants reported feeling somewhat to very confident in engaging colleagues in departmental change.

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By the end of the professional development program, 91% of participants reported confidence in how to create organizational change.

By the end of the professional development program, a total of 74% of participants indicated they were somewhat or very confident that they could marshal resources necessary for change.

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Planning and Taking Action to Address Diversity and Inclusion

Participants reported statistically significant increases in the implementation of plans to improve interactions in the department. The implementation of plans happened at the individual and departmental levels. While it was expected that there would be an increase in action due to the design of TECAID, it is important that individuals moved from not taking action or engaging in discussion, to creating and implementing plans.

By the end of the professional development program, participants who reported not taking any action in the last 6 months dropped from 37% to 0%.

By the end of the professional development program, departments that had taken no action to improve interactions among faculty, students, and staff decreased from 32% to 4%.

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